Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 8 – G’Day Mate

In this episode Max and Justin take a trip down under, and back to the future, and  talk with John Creasey, an avid home shop machinist from Australia.  As usual the discussion topics vary considerably, but we do talk a bit of machining.  In this episode you’ll find:

  • John and Justin get a little teary eyed over the Queen.  Don’t worry – we don’t break out in God Save the Queen
  • Australian politics: the laws of mathematics are no match for the Australian government!
  • John lets us know he has 2 Myfords.  His first was purchased by his father when he was 16.  Let’s here it for great Dads!
  • Electric cars, VW Vanagons, and taking things apart when we were kids
  • We talk about scouting, ripping out hard drives, and rip apart day
  • Stefan is mentioned numerous times
  • Did Max forget to empty his shop dehumidifier?
  • Arduinos in the home shop: Edu Puertas (stop motion) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdEtDnvVeoqlKzpquM7IsNA and the Arduino lead screw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaBK9teKUaA

All that and much much more.

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Many many thanks goes to John for getting up early to join us.  John’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/creaseyjohn/.  Be sure to subscribe to John’s Youtube channel (check you his amazing chess set build): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwfr0K9NJKIgxOqYr5TTeJg.  John also put together the Youtube Machinists Facebook group.

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Schaublin 102 is Making Chips!

Although I’ve talked about it with Max on the podcast, I’ve never announced on the blog that I picked up a made in Switzerland Schaublin 102.  102 is the turning radius in millimeters (about 4 inches).  The lathe was in pieces, but in very workable condition.  I dragged it home and it sat for a few months until I found the time to get to working on it.

This week I finally managed to get the 102 making chips.  It took some work mostly in the drive area.  I didn’t have access to the proper voltage to drive the existing motor so I decided to replace the original Schaublin motor with new 3/4 HP Baldor that I picked up a year ago for $50.  I also wanted to keep the mechanical variable speed drive working.  I could have got the old motor rewound, and I might do that some day, but the $800 that I was quoted was a bit rich.

After modelling up the existing motor in Fusion I designed up a pulley to fit the Baldor, spacers to place the new motor in the same location as the old one and a motor mounting plate.  I used old school methods to make up a plate to mount the VFD and associated electrical components.

I made a montage type video of all the work:

I was pretty happy with how it turned out.  Here is an animated gif showing a test cut that I did with the lathe:

Aside from making up the required parts, I spent a fair bit of time cleaning out the bed, cross slide, tailstock and the interesting air – oil lubricating unit for the spindle bearings.  I also have several hours fishing the air – oil lubrication lines back into place in the headstock.

I’ve never used a plain turning lathe before, and quite frankly until I did I thought they were a bit of a joke.  In the past no carriage or leadscrew caused me to immediately write off plain turning lathes as useless machines.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  In fact, as I used my import lathe more (which has a carriage and leadscrew) I realized that I do 80% of my work without such features.  If you have the chance to pickup a plain turning lathe in good condition, jump at it!   Many people devalue such machines and as such you can sometimes get a very good deal on a lathe that is exceptionally capable – and a joy to use.

Next up is a proper toolpost for the lathe, a backing plate for a Buck 6 jaw chuck I picked up, and probably a faceplate.  That is unless I manage to pick this stuff up used somewhere.  I really don’t count on that happening though.  Parts and associated tooling for Schaublins usually demand high prices.

 

 

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 7 – Work Holding

In a first for us we manage to get an episode recorded, edited, and posted in about 2 weeks!  Don’t worry we didn’t skimp on the quantity of the recording – this episode is a long as the rest of them (note nothing was said about quality!). In this episode we talk about work holding and tool holding in general.  Apologies for our voices – we both were recovering from colds.  Highlights include:

    • Max gets his turret finished just in time for Emma’s tool making competition: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xe3ACUzET7Y Check out the pile of chips on the watchmaker’s lathe:
    • Justin is inching (what is the metric equivalent?) towards getting the Schaublin 102 up and running.
    • Someone opens a beverage.  Identify the time and send Justin an email: justin@thecogwheel.net  to claim your prize!
    • Justin is recording in the middle of a terrible thunderstorm.
    • 2 Jaw independent chuck?  We talk about one:
    • Justin and Max are big fans of ER collets.  Maritool is a great source for production quality stuff at reasonable prices.
    • Stefan Gotteswinter gets his mention.
    • Use your 3D printer, or a 3D printing service to make soft jaws for your vise!  Or a fixture setup for your face plate.
    • Clamping nuts – we don’t know what they are called but Max made up a set of them.  Identify them, send Justin and email justin@thecogwheel.net and claim your prize!
    • Max thinks Justin should build some die holders with driving squares in them like these ones:

All that and much much more.

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Happy 150th Canada!

What better way to celebrate a long week-end in the summer than by making a delicious dessert to share with family and friends. I attached a 1 1/2″ spade bit to my husband’s mini-mill this morning to mix the base for this strawberry cheese-cake trifle. The bundt pan for the angel food-cake fit perfectly in the heat-treating oven, and the strawberries were firm enough to slice on the bandsaw (wipe the blade down first!)

Happy Birthday Canada! (and Happy Independence Day to our American friends to the south on Tuesday!)

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 6 – All Scraped Up

Despite our terrible bantering in episode 2, Stefan Gotteswinter decides to come back on.  Max and I think perhaps he might be suffering from poor judgement.  In the longest episode to date we talk about:

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Many many thanks to Stefan for coming back on.  You can find his website here: http://gtwr.de/  Stefan also has one of the best machining Youtube channels: https://www.youtube.com/user/syyl.On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stefan_gtwr/

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Pentel P209 Teardown

wrTie has begun!

To start off my titanium mechanical pencil build, called wrTie, I decided to teardown a number of different mechanical pencils for inspiration and design ideas.  I find the mechanisms in mechanical pencils very interesting.  I also find the manufacturing processes that are used exceptionally interesting.

Here is a teardown video of my favourite mass produced mechanical pencil: the Pentel P209 (0.9 mm version).  The Pentel P20x series (there are 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9 mm models)  has been around for a long time.  It is exceptionally well made given the price point it is hitting and the parts involved.  There are 12 parts in total, including 5 fully machined parts.  A number of the parts require plating.  There are 2 parts that are molded out of plastic.  And then it has to be assembled!  You can buy a Pentel P209 for less than $5 in the United States and less than $7 in Canada.  That’s actually pretty crazy considering this pencil contains machined parts and even more so once you consider that Pentel is probably selling it to it’s retailers for less than half of what they are retailed for.

https://youtu.be/tM4h61_BLKQ

The heart of the Pentel 200 series is a removable fully contained feeding cartridge.  The cartridge features a number of machined components in the feeding mechanism.  The components are probably massed produced on swiss style screw machines (a lathe but instead of the carriage moving the spindle moves in the Z direction – often called sliding headstock machines).   These machines could be cam actuated screw machines or they could be CNC controlled units.  CNC swiss style machines, like the ones produced by Star or Citizen, are really interesting machines.  Here is a video of a Citizen L20, one of the more popular CNC swiss machine that you will find today:

The Pentel P209 cartridge has been used in a number of titanium mechanical pencil builds on Kickstarter.  I can’t confirm it directly as I haven’t purchased one, but check out this project (you have to scroll about half way down and you’ll see a picture of what looks to be the Pentel cartridge: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cogent/titanium-mechanical-pencil-and-titanium-pen.  Given the Pentel’s design, you could easily make a new mechanical pencil by machining a new outside body for the Pentel.  I won’t be doing that because I think it is too easy!

 

 

 

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 5 – Cake Decorating and Hauling Iron

After getting confused as to what podcast they are recording, Max and Justin talk about hauling machine tools home.  Of course the stories keep getting better and more ostentatious the more they are told.  We also talk about:

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel