Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 20 – Hot Shot (360)!

Stan Zinkosky of Bar Z Industrial joins us to talk about music, heating treating ovens, and the first day of summer!

Some of the things we talk about include:

And much more!  You can listen to it here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Many thanks to Stan for joining us.  You can follow him on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/barzindustrial/  and also on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCircIu8sQ-e67gH4kcb0xdA.  Here is the Bar Z Industrial page: http://www.barzindustrial.com/

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/.  Also be sure to check out Max’s Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/joyofprecision

Stefan Gotteswinter website: http://www.gtwr.de/  and also his Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/syyl  Stefan’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stefan_gtwr/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/.  Justin is also now on Ko-fi: https://ko-fi.com/thecogwheel

The introduction music (Keeping Stuff Together by  Lee Rosevere) was used under a Creative Commons license.  Be sure to check out Lee Rosevere!

Ko-fi

This is a quick post to announce the Ko-fi page that I have setup: https://www.ko-fi.com/thecogwheel

If you like what I do and want to support what I do you can do that by either purchasing something from the store or heading over to Ko-fi.  Why Ko-fi?  Well Patreon has its issues.  I’ll leave it at that.  Ko-fi also doesn’t take a cut.

Supporting via Ko-fi (or by purchasing something from the store found on this blog) will help me continue to publish drawing and videos of various home shop machinist projects.  I’m also working on some amateur astronomy projects.  Direct support also helps prioritize the time I spend in the shop making content.

If there is a home shop machinist project you’d like to see send me an email and I’ll add it to the list.  I can’t promise that it will get done but I’m always looking for ideas.

I also want to let everyone know who reads this blog, watches my Youtube videos, or follows me on Instagram that I will never promote or sell another company’s product in exchange for compensation (whether that be free product or direct financial compensation).  Products that I show here are purchased with my own money (purchased at market rate) and I purchased them because I think they will help me in my shop.

Thanks everyone!

 

 

Carriage Stop

This is another project that has been on the to do list for quite awhile now.  I’ve been needing a slitting saw lathe carriage stop every since I bought my first lathe and have managed to put it off by using a mag base.  It was time to make a proper carriage / indicator stop for the Standard Modern 12″ Utilathe.  I designed up the stop so that you didn’t have to be constantly reaching for tools to adjust it – all the items that need to be adjusted regularly have integrated handles.  I’m using a 2″ indicator.

As Max Phillips would say I kinda went all watchmaker on it.  I didn’t intend to get this carried away but as I was working on this project I questioned myself as to why (as a society) we seem to always want to rush though things just to get them done.  Isn’t the journey where all the enjoyment comes from?  Isn’t it enjoyable and satisfying to create things that you are pleased with?

Deep within all of us is a need to be creative and make things (both tangible and not) to the best of our ability.  We are not robots.  This not a spiritual blog but I am a reformed Christian and I believe  that every single human being is created Imago Dei (in the image of God).  God creates and since we are made in His image we also create.

Back to our project.  I roughed out the lathe bed profile on the bandsaw:

and finished that portion up on the shaper:

The rest of the project was simple lathe and mill work.

This was made specifically for the Standard Modern 12″ Utilathe.  The drawings that I made up reflect that particular lathe.  But it should be very straight forward to adjust the drawings for your lathe if you wish.  If anyone wants the solid model send me an email and I will get the data to you somehow.

Also I’m considering a run of 5-10 or so of each of the tools I make for myself to sell for others.  If you want to purchase one of these stay tuned – I will update the store portion of the blog to reflect that.

Here is the drawing – Carriage Stop – Rev 01.

If you are interested here is the build video:

 

 

Slitting Saw Arbor

This is a project that has been on the to do list for quite awhile now.  I’ve been needing a slitting saw setup since day one and have managed to put it off by using the bandsaw or hacksaw for most of my work.  It was time to make a proper slitting saw arbor.

Most of the “low end” slitting saw arbors you can buy are terrible.  The spring loaded ones that can utilize multiple arbor sizes are particularly bad.  I wanted a simple design for a 1″ diameter arbor size so I machined up one in less than an evening.  I utilized a 3/4″ straight shank so I could use it in the milling machine or lathe.  If you were running very thick saws, or horizontal milling cutters (not the greatest idea in a cantilever R8 setup?) you probably would want a keyway in the design in which case I would probably make the shank taper integral to the design.

But this one is for thin slitting saws and as such no keyway is required and being held in collet is my preferred setup.

There is nothing complicated about this at all.  But to save you some time sketching or drawing here are the drawings I used: Body – Rev 01 and Cap – Rev 01.  I didn’t add a flat on the arbor for removing and replacing the saws at the bench – I might do that at a later time if I find I need it.  If so I’ll update the drawings.

If you are interested here is the build video:

 

CNC Router Table

It’s been a cold winter.  In an effort to help moderate the temperature in my shop I decided to add another piece of equipment.  The extra mass will help smooth out large temperature swings.  What machine did I drag home this time?  That’s a bit of a long story because I found out later that the machine I brought home wasn’t exactly the machine it was advertised as.

The machine is branded as a Torcam (not Tormach!) ~ 24″ x ~ 24″ x ~ 3″  (X / Y / Z) Router table.  It is constructed out of aluminum extrusions and utilizes linear rails and ball screws.  This was the main reason I decided to purchase the machine.  Once I saw the linear rails and ball screws (and how little the machine had been used) I was sold. After loading the machine into the Sienna, (yes we did break down and buy a minivan for our family and it has been once of the best loathed decisions we ever made!) I snapped a quick picture of my purchase:

The machine did not come with a control which didn’t bother me one bit.  I had full intentions of fitting a more up to date modern control anyway.  The very very reasonable price I purchased the machine for left plenty of funds to put together a new motion controller.

But I was curious the whole time about this Torcam company.  I had never heard of Torcam before and I didn’t do any research regarding the company beforehand.  After some digging on the internet I found out that Torcam was a machine tool distributor company out of Ontario Canada who built and sold CNC machines for the educational market.  It seems they rebranded machines for sale and it is doubtful that they actually designed and built full machines but I could be completely wrong.  It appears the were a going concern in the 1990s to early 2000s and then they disappeared.  Given the timeframe of business operations (just before the internet exploded) and what appears to be a limited market for product, very little information is easily found about Torcam and their machines today.

This machine appeared to be very well designed and assembled with care. But who actually made the machine? As soon as I purchased the machine I posted a picture on Instagram and Stefan Gotteswinter immediately commented “ISEL?”.  ISEL is a German CNC machine builder who also sells various motion components.  ISEL has been in business for a very long time and according to Stefan builds good components and machines for the price.  I think most in the industry agree that ISEL stuff is built to a price point and does the job very well.

The machine does look suspiciously German and like something ISEL would manufacture so I decided to find out.  After taking a few covers off I noticed this:

It was confirmed.  This machine was made with ISEL components and I also now had an approximate date of manufacture.  All the components say made in West Germany.  That gives you a good idea when this machine was made: early 1990s.  I suspect Torcam started importing these machines and selling them.  I don’t know what control they shipped with it (did they make their own?) but the hardware was ISEL made.

I made a video and posted it on Youtube (see below).  Shortly after posting John commented on the video: “What you have is a Techno Isel router table. Originally released in the late 80’s and early 90’s I can with what was called a machine 100 MS cos controller. Back in the day a new on would be about $ 8000 or so. I have the same machine from the 80’s it ran model and prototype production 24-7 for about two years. I mothballed it for some while then had a new controller built and I still use it today. I made a mount for. 3 h.p. Ryobi router when I first got it in 1987 and it still works like a charm. I run V carve desktop and Mach 3 on it making sings and doing woodwork. My table is 52 by 52 . By the way the stepper can get warm but they seem to convey the heat well. Never any problems running it for 10 to 12 hour runs. Just stay inside the feeds and speeds. The ball screws are a big plus but keep them clean. Like yours mine had no goers on the x and y rails.”  Thanks John!!!!

The first step in getting the machine working was building a stand.  I took a Saturday morning and put together a quick wood stand.  I would have liked to have a welded or concrete stand for it but the weather didn’t permit me working outside so I settled for wood.  Maybe in the future I might make a more substantial stand.

I also took some time to make up some leveling feet that would screw onto the legs of the stand:

Once the stand was built it was time to decide upon the motion controller.  I looked at a few options like the Centroid Acorn and Mach 4 but I decided upon LinuxCNC.  Lot’s of folks are scare of Linux but let me tell you that this was a very straight forward process to get going.  I used the Mesa 5i25 and 7i76 LinuxCNC plug and go kit.  It was pricey but is a proper motion control interface that utilizes a FPGA in the 5i25.  If you purchase the plug and go kit it has the proper firmware flashed on it already that saves you from having to re-flash the Mesa board.  Even that though isn’t as hard as it sounds!

For motors and drives I used some stuff sitting around in the shop for a few years.  I purchased 3 motors and drives used a number of years back.  The motors were 60BYGH303-13 425 ounce inch dual shaft steppers that were almost a drop replacement for the small steppers that the machine came with.  The drives were knock offs of knock offs drives.  Very little information is available for the CW230 stepper driver but I did some comparing and it appears that they are copies of the Keling KL4030 drive which seems to be based on an older Leadshine or Gecko drive.  I set them up to run at 36 volts (using a linear power supply which will probably burn out) and used 1/8 micro stepping – the highest you probably should go.  I built up a panel and put all the bits inside.  Here you can see it in progress:

Setting up LinuxCNC was a simple as wiring up the Mesa interface board, installing LinuxCNC on an older computer and running the configuration wizard.  You need to be careful to enter the information into the wizard properly.  I entered everything carefully and once done I ran LinuxCNC and moved the table around.  I used stock drive timings for the KL4030 that were directly out of the wizard.

I wired up the homing switches and tried to tidy up the wiring as best I could with some cable chain and wire loom.  Now I need to mount a spindle and start cutting out parts!  I may spend some more time tuning the drives and getting the system dialed in but so far I’m very pleased.  I’m hoping to post some more information regarding setting up LinuxCNC soon so stay tuned!

I also made a video of the work.  Have a look:

 

Shop Made Yo-Yos

Over 6 months ago now I finally finished a pair of yo-yos I made for family friends who gave us a wagon for our kids.  The wagon was a very well made wagon and I wanted to make a special gift for the family in return.  I remembered how much I enjoyed yo-yos when I was a kid so I decided to make up one for each of their 2 girls.

The design is very straightforward.  Essentially it is 2 aluminum halves with a tool steel axle.  I chose to make the bearing / bushing out of some Teflon I had in the shop.   You could easily modify the design to use the very common rolling element bearings that so many yo-yos utilize these days.  The trickiest part of the design is sizing the o-ring that sits in each of the halves.  The size and cross sectional area of the o-ring used determines how easily (if at all) the yo-you will return to your hand.  If you remove the o-ring completely the yo-yo may never return to your hand and probably will require what is called a “binding” trick which causes the yo-yo to recoil its string.  Since I wanted these yo-yos to be easy to use for beginners I sized the o-ring so the yo-yo will return with a easy flick of the wrist.

The project made heavy use of the 5C collet chuck that I previously reviewed.  The chuck worked out very well and the soft 5C collets that I used made the job much easier and quicker than it would have taken using the old 4 jaw standby.

I chose to press in 12 pieces of brass on the outer rim for added mass where it is needed most.  Besides making up 48 pieces of brass for 2 yo-yos the process was very easy.  After the brass was pressed in I cut the outside radii with a custom form tool I made up in the shop.  I also made a video of making the form tool.  You can watch that video here:

Besides the custom form tool for the radii, there were a number of other tools I ground up to make this yo-yo.  The project once again highlights the basic home shop need of being able to grind high speed steel tools.  If I had to purchase all the cutting tools I needed for this project the cost would have been significant.

I also did a full build video of the process.  Many thanks to Megan for recording music for the introduction.

If you are interested in the drawings you can download them here:

Body – Rev 01, Bushing – Rev 01, Axle – Rev 01, Yo-Yo – Rev 01.

 

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 19 – CAD

In this episode learn that Pretzel sticks are universal and one of the snacks that perhaps we home shop machinists can use to break down modern day barriers.  Or maybe join Max and have some good old fashion Americana Ritz crackers and join the 3 of us talk about CAD – a subject that we could did talk about for hours.

Some of the things we talk about include:

And much more!  You can listen to it here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/.  Also be sure to check out Max’s Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/joyofprecision

Stefan Gotteswinter (our occasional host!) website: http://www.gtwr.de/  and also his Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/syyl  Stefan’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stefan_gtwr/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/