Shop Made Yo-Yos

Over 6 months ago now I finally finished a pair of yo-yos I made for family friends who gave us a wagon for our kids.  The wagon was a very well made wagon and I wanted to make a special gift for the family in return.  I remembered how much I enjoyed yo-yos when I was a kid so I decided to make up one for each of their 2 girls.

The design is very straightforward.  Essentially it is 2 aluminum halves with a tool steel axle.  I chose to make the bearing / bushing out of some Teflon I had in the shop.   You could easily modify the design to use the very common rolling element bearings that so many yo-yos utilize these days.  The trickiest part of the design is sizing the o-ring that sits in each of the halves.  The size and cross sectional area of the o-ring used determines how easily (if at all) the yo-you will return to your hand.  If you remove the o-ring completely the yo-yo may never return to your hand and probably will require what is called a “binding” trick which causes the yo-yo to recoil its string.  Since I wanted these yo-yos to be easy to use for beginners I sized the o-ring so the yo-yo will return with a easy flick of the wrist.

The project made heavy use of the 5C collet chuck that I previously reviewed.  The chuck worked out very well and the soft 5C collets that I used made the job much easier and quicker than it would have taken using the old 4 jaw standby.

I chose to press in 12 pieces of brass on the outer rim for added mass where it is needed most.  Besides making up 48 pieces of brass for 2 yo-yos the process was very easy.  After the brass was pressed in I cut the outside radii with a custom form tool I made up in the shop.  I also made a video of making the form tool.  You can watch that video here:

Besides the custom form tool for the radii, there were a number of other tools I ground up to make this yo-yo.  The project once again highlights the basic home shop need of being able to grind high speed steel tools.  If I had to purchase all the cutting tools I needed for this project the cost would have been significant.

I also did a full build video of the process.  Many thanks to Megan for recording music for the introduction.

If you are interested in the drawings you can download them here:

Body – Rev 01, Bushing – Rev 01, Axle – Rev 01, Yo-Yo – Rev 01.

 

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 19 – CAD

In this episode learn that Pretzel sticks are universal and one of the snacks that perhaps we home shop machinists can use to break down modern day barriers.  Or maybe join Max and have some good old fashion Americana Ritz crackers and join the 3 of us talk about CAD – a subject that we could did talk about for hours.

Some of the things we talk about include:

And much more!  You can listen to it here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/.  Also be sure to check out Max’s Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/joyofprecision

Stefan Gotteswinter (our occasional host!) website: http://www.gtwr.de/  and also his Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/syyl  Stefan’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stefan_gtwr/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 18 – NYCNC

No the podcast is not dead!  After a very large pause (for various reasons – a story for another day) the podcast is back with an episode recorded way back in September.  Nevertheless the conversation is timeless and just as applicable today as it was when it was recorded.  In this episode John Saunders, the man who went from a humble machine shop apartment in New York City to a full fledged machine shop in Ohio, joins us and talks shop.  Some of the things we talk about include:

  • CNC machine tools of all sorts!
  • CNC tooling
  • April Fools day jokes
  • SMW Johnny 5
  • Telsas, Makerspaces and the future.

And much more!  You can listen to it here:

or you can download it directly.

Many many thanks to John for taking time out of his very busy schedule and record a show with us.  John’s business is Saunders Machine Works.  He runs another page which reflects his beginnings in a New York apartment called NYCNC.  His Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/nyccnc.  You can follow John on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/saundersmachineworks/.  John also is co-host of a podcast with John Grimsmo called the Business of Machining.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Stefan Gotteswinter (our occasional host!) website: http://www.gtwr.de/  and also his Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/syyl  Stefan’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stefan_gtwr/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 17a – ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas

It’s been a long time since we have posted an episode and that has been my (Justin’s) fault.  I won’t go into the details but I wanted to let everyone know that the podcast will continue in the near future.  In the meantime I wanted to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and Happy and Healthy 2019 home shop machinists style.  Stay tuned!

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house,
Not a creature was stirring, so I sneaked out like a mouse.
The drill bits were placed in their index with care,
In hopes that new tooling soon would be there.

The machine tools were cleaned, and oiled in their place,
While visions of a Moore jig borer brought a smile to my face.
And while my family was inside and all snug in their beds,
I was working to finish some Christmas gifts for them instead.

When out in the shop there arose such a chatter,
I sprang from my band saw to see what was the matter.
Away to the lathe I flew like a flash,
Hitting the big red stop, it ended with a crash.

Some light on the now freshly wrecked homemade tool
Meant no new gifts would be delivered this yule.
When, what to my wondering eyes should appear,
But a Fiat Panda, and a very tall Stefan Gotteswinter.

With a little old wrench used lively and quick,
I knew in a moment he would show me his sharpening trick.
More rapid than lightening I took out the workpiece,
And I sharpened the tool to finish the gift for my niece.

“Now Hardinge, now Wrong Fu, now Deckel, and Myford!
On Linley, on Schaublin, on Monarch and Boxford,
To the Deckel clone!, to the sharpening stone!
No need to dress the CBN cone!

And then, in a twinkling, I heard “this will not do”
Stefan was examining my grinder through and through.
As I drew in my head, and was turning around,
Out of the Panda came Stefan with Biax scraper inbound.

He was soon covered in Canode from his head to his foot,
His clothes were all blue and yellow, including his boots.
The efficient German worked diligently through,
To turn my Deckel clone into something much more true.

A wink of his eye and a scrape by his hand,
Soon gave me to know I would have nothing to dread.
He spoke not a word, except for Youtube,
And educated the masses so they were no longer noobs.

Soon the Deckel was done, everything adjusted up right,
Then Stefan Gotteswinter fled back into the night.
And as he started off in his Panda to journey back home,
He rolled down his window and gestured towards the Deckel clone.

I heard him exclaim as he drove out of sight,
Merry Christmas to all and to all a good night!
Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Stefan Gotteswinter (our occasional host!) website: http://www.gtwr.de/  and also his Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/syyl  Stefan’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stefan_gtwr/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 17 – Home $hop Machini$t

2 episodes in one month!  We can’t believe it either.  Don’t worry though we didn’t cut on quantity to get it out – this episode is still over 2 hours.  We won’t talk about the quality.  Max, Stefan and Justin give shop updates (it has been about 4 months since Stefan has been on – that’s long enough for Stefan to build an entire Saturn V rocket in his basement).  After that we talk about making money in the home $hop – when your hobby turns into a business.  And no we aren’t the Business of Machining Podcast.  In between the weirdness:

  • Stefan is busy making telescope parts for the Hubble Space telescope a local company requiring telescope parts.
  • Stefan is on the lookout for a new lathe.  He would like a Hardinge HLV (don’t we all!).
  • Justin and Max suggest looking at the Taiwanese clones like Cyclematic or Feeler
  • Stefan broke down and bought a face mill with carbide inserts:
  • Lancaster Watch Tools: https://www.instagram.com/lancaster_watch_tools/
  • Max is working on a license plate holder for his AMG.
  • Justin’s diamond dressers for the bench grinder are now for sale.  You can find them on this site.
  • Stefan is the reason why small shapers and grinders now cost an arm and a leg and everyone wants one.
  • We talk about turning your home shop into a business.  Over the past few years Stefan has done more and more work for clients.
  • Keep it a hobby – you don’t want to destroy the fun in your life!
  • Stefan does some work for this guy: https://www.instagram.com/stories/watchmaker.kl/
  • Justin is upset about all the Bang Good advertising on Youtube.

And much more!  You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Stefan Gotteswinter (our occasional host!) website: http://www.gtwr.de/  and also his Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/syyl  Stefan’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stefan_gtwr/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

5C Collet Chuck

A few months ago I purchased one of the popular import 5C collet chucks for my home shop.  I’ve been investigating different ways to employ a proper collet setup in the home shop for awhile.  At first I was considering going the ER collet route and purchasing, or making, an ER collet backplate for my lathe due to the large grip range of ER collets and that they are very plentiful.  From a manufacturing engineering standpoint ER collets are not considered proper work holding collet, being designed specifically for tooling, but they actually do a good job in the home shop for work holding provided you are aware of the short comings:

  1. ER collets are generally not available in square or hexagon.  This isn’t as big of deal as it may seem – many folks use ER collets and simply grip on the the edges of non round stock.
  2. ER collets require more grip length than almost all work holding collets.  This is probably the biggest downfall to using ER collets in the home shop.  Holding onto a very short part in an ER collet in most cases is asking for trouble.  Even more sketchy would be holding onto just the edges of short square or hexagonal parts in an ER collet.
  3. ER collets require relatively high tightening torques.  This isn’t a big deal with the smaller sizes, but once you get into the larger sizes (greater than ER20) it becomes a pain.  For example ER32 is recommended to be torqued at 100 foot pounds!
  4. No emergency or soft collets available.  I suppose you could make up some soft ER collets fairly quickly though.
  5. No ER pot chucks, clutch collets, step collets, oversize collets, or whatever you want to call them.

Most of the above reasons are relativity minor when comparing ER to standard work holding collets.  Many of the above downfalls of ER collets are offset, especially when you are starting out, by the fact that you can use ER collets and collet chucks for both work holding and tool holding.  ER collets also have a very large grip range – meaning you need fewer collets to cover a range of sizes.  This can save money on tooling, which can be a big deal in the home shop and was precisely why I was seriously considering using ER as I already had a some collets in the shop.  When you consider you can purchase the ER collet backplates for less than $100 or make them easily in your home shop it’s a logical choice.

But I decided to go with a standard work holding collet, mainly for reasons 2 and 5.    I chose 5C as it is by far the most popular work holding collet available.  There is a plentiful used market and new collets are inexpensive.  Soft and clutch collets are inexpensive and I can get them next day from a local tooling supplier.

There are a few options for the actual collet chuck.  Import ones are available from numerous suppliers for below $200 and this is the route I went.  I actually ordered it off Amazon Canada.    If you are looking for something of higher reputation (note generally most of the import one are actually decent) you can purchase a standard accuracy Bison ones for around $500 with a stated .0008″ TIR.  A super precision one is available for $900 with a stated .0004″ TIR.

My import 5C collet chuck has less than .0008″ TIR, which is less than the stated accuracy of the standard Bison one at less than half the cost.  It is very well finished and so far works exceptionally well.  I have ordered inexpensive $12 emergency collets for it, and also I have been using it with a custom bored 3″ pot chuck recently for a repetitive job.  With careful loading I was indicating less than .0005″ runout on this job.

A few weeks ago now I also made a video of the chuck, including some of the mounting of it on the 2 lathes in the shop.  I recommend people to get a standard backplate one and either make up your own backplate or buy one.  By mounting the chuck on a backplate it gives you an interface to adjust the TIR to zero – if the mounting system is directly manufactured into the chuck your options are probably limited to regrinding the taper in situ to improve accuracy of the chuck.

If you are a more of your make your own tools type Andy Lofquist over at Metal Lathe Accessories has an interesting 5C collet chuck kit that you can machine yourself.

 

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 16 – King Tutley

After a one month hiatus due to a number of reasons (typical of home shop machining), Max and Justin are joined by the King of 16″ South Bend lathes: Tom Utley.  But nobody in the hobby calls him that.  He is King Tutley.  Tom, an engineer by day, is best know in this hobby for his time (over the last 3 years!) and dedication in taking a clapped out  second world war 16″ South Bend lathe and returning it to better than new condition.  Some of the interesting topics:

  • Tom talks about the bench grinders he has been working on that will soon be up for sale.  If you are interested in getting a properly restored Baldor bench grinder be sure to get in touch with Tom!
  • We talk about paint.  Is 2 part epoxies worth the trouble for machine tools?
  •  Previously a woodworker Tom has moved into the metal side of things.  The people are generally more friendly, albeit slightly less normal.
  • Why don’t we encourage more to work with their hands?  All three of us share our frustrations with a general society that no longer values craft work.  Shop work is good for the soul!
  • A well documented page on Tom’s journey: http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/1943-south-bend-16-x-60-lathe-resurrection-299300/
  • Chemical Etching.  Tom has done a fantastic job with all the brass name and label plates on his South Bend:
  • Photo resist etching.  More popular with watchmaking types, Max talks a bit about his journey into photo resist etching:
  • Variable Frequency drives.  Tom has put a great deal of effort into the VFD controls, enclosure, and wiring has installed on his lathe.  It is one of the best executed projects of such nature on the web:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opxVLWTiW7E
  • Huanyang VFDs: a fine German made product?
  • The Guillocheur Video: https://youtu.be/uN-zN8OLh_w
  • Of course would the show be a show without mentioning Stefan?

And much more!  You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Many many thanks to Tom for coming on the show and sharing some of his story.  Tom is very active on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kingtutley/  We also encouraged Tom to more actively tell his story on Youtube.  Everyone subscribe to his Youtube channel!  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfhJT5GO9B0QwUo007XMsGQ

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Stefan Gotteswinter (our occasional host!) website: http://www.gtwr.de/  and also his Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/syyl  Stefan’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stefan_gtwr/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/