Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 13 – Have You Checked Your Oil?

After over a one month hiatus, Max and Justin are back with episode 13!

Some of the things we talk about include:

  • Max has had limited time in the shop.  What does work always get in the way of what we want to do?
  • Justin purchased a sub $200 USD digital read out from eBay.  He calls it the Shenzhen DRO.  And so far it has been pretty good.
  • Justin’s new lathe – a Standard Modern 12×30 Utilathe.  It was terribly dirty.
  • Which leads us into maintenance.  Why do so many people neglect equipment?
  • Max goes into the wonderfully simple cone style plain bearings.  Keep it clean and adjusted!
  • Bearing preload
  • How do you keep track of all those oil points?
  • The importance of way oil
  • Chuck lube.  Let the debate begin.  Max and Justin like getting sprayed with oil apparently.
  • A live stream episode with Stefan Gotteswinter and Robin Renzetti?  Let us know your thoughts!

All that and a few tangents (would it be a show without a few?)

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 12 – ABOM79!!!

In this appropriately large episode Max and Justin talk shop with the great machinist and skilled Youtuber Adam Booth (ABOM79)!

Some of the things we talk about include:

  • Adam’s amazing work ethic
  • Behind the scenes of a successful Youtuber: hard work and dedication
  • Adam’s love and respect for his followers and fans
  • Pride and Ownership:  Adam tells everyone to do their job, whatever it may be, to the best of his or her ability
  • Working for someone and working for yourself
  • The giant shaper and its new home
  • Adam’s future plans for his shop and equipment
  • Beer.  Don’t tell us you’re surprised!
  • Why this show is so long

All that and much more!

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

A very grateful thanks goes out to Adam for agreeing to take some time out of his very busy schedule and join us on the show.  You can find Adam on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/Abom79 and on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/abom79

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Fixing a Mill Drill Stand

If you listen to the podcast you already know that I purchased a Rong Fu Mill Drill.  While some people have issues with the round column, the mill drill is a significant step up in machine capacity and machining performance when compared to the X2 mini mill.

For those unfamiliar, the Rong Fu Mill Drill looks to be a heavily modified drill press.  There are several size variations, but most utilize a R8 tapered spindle with provisions for a draw bar.  The dovetail table has a relatively large travel of about 450 mm (over 17″) and 200 mm (just under 8″).

While there is much debate on the origins of the Taiwanese mill drills that started showing up in the 1970s, the most probable explanation is they are simply rather crude copies of the Fehlmann mill drill machines.  Fehlmann is a Swiss machine tool manufacturer and they still build a number of mill drill machines, although I suspect you if have to ask the price you cannot afford them.  Besides the very similar appearance, the main reason I think the Rong Fu mill drills are copies of the Fehlmann is primarily because of the tapered gibs on the Rong Fu table.  Fehlmann being a Swiss machine tool company in and of itself is another telling reason why they were copied.

Round column mills are not just limited to two companies.  Emco also  manufactured several round column mills around the same time as Rong Fu started.  A German company  also manufactured a nice home shop mill drill branded as Ixion around the same time or slightly before the Rong Fus started flooding the home shop market.

The Rong Fu mill drill I purchased came with the typical flimsy tuna can stand that is oh so common on import machine tools.  I did not purchase the machine new and the previous owner was selling the stand with it, otherwise I would have passed on the stand and just built one.  Initially I was going to weld up a new stand out of 2×2 steel tubing, but then I thought could I just dump a bunch of concrete in the bottom and kill 2 birds with one stone; adding weight and rigidity?  That and I find concrete a very useful engineering material in the home shop from previous antics.

And that’s exactly what I did.  For less than $75 and one day’s home shop work, which is less than what the material alone would have cost for a tubing stand, I now have a rigid machine tool stand.

I’ll be posting further on the mill drill as I use it, but so far it has been a great addition to the shop.

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 11 – Shop of the Future

In this episode Max and Justin decide to prognosticate about what the home machining shop of the future looks like.  50 or 100 years down the road is it going to be full of modified CNC machines, or will the electronics on those machines render them scrap and only the old school manual machines still be in use?  We talk about

  • Max’s sea foam green stamping fixture
  • Max is working on a new TV stand for the house
  • Justin finished his tailstock tap and die holder
  • A new mill drill for Justin’s shop.  Did he make the Rong choice?
  • The Dodge Omni and Shelby GLHS
  • Do all VW owners hate Honda owners?
  • Max’s hatred for all things Digifant
  • Laser bandsaws
  • Motivated millennials: will they keep CNC machines going?
  • Are we living in an golden era for home shop machining?
  • Will the cheap tooling end?

All that and much much more!

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 10 – Practitioner of the Mechanical Arts

In this episode Max and Justin talk with the great Robin Renzetti, Practitioner of the Mechanical Arts (Robin – we hope you have that on your business card!).  We talk about:

  • Robin’s gifted ability of machining and all things mechanical
  • Robin’s resume.  A model of a helicopter rotor head.  And yes, he made very piece in his spare time!
  • A little bit about Robin’s shop
  • Foundations of Mechanical Accuracy
  • Turcite and gluing it with Loctite Black Max 380
  • Other Loctite products
  • Moore pattern scraping
  • Scraper sharpening
  • Spindle design & bearings
  • Import collet tricks
  • ER vs 5C style collets on work holding – make sure when using ER collets as work holding collets the stock sticks through the entire collet!
  • Pot collet runout and Robin’s pot collet setup:
  • Jaw chuck repeatability
  • Jacobs taper size
  • # screw size formula
  • Mapp gas turbo torch and silver soldering
  • Lathe file body oil
  • HSS belt sander backer

All that and much more for over 2 hours of listening!

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Many thanks goes out to Robin for taking the time to be on the show.  Be sure to give him a follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/robinrenzetti/ and also subscribe on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ROBRENZ

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 9 – We Are Finished!

In this episode Max and Justin talk about finishing and both agree that they are terrible at actually finishing projects.  In fact, it is amazing that this podcast is still being recorded and not sitting on a shelf somewhere collecting dust waiting for completion.  It did actually sit for about a week until Justin managed to finish the editing!  In this episode:

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Shop Made Quick Change Toolpost

A few weeks ago now I finished a quick change toolpost for the Schaublin.

The design is based on Andy Lofquist’s MLA-23 toolpost.  Andy is the man behind the wonderful Metal Lathe Accessories kits (http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/).  While I’ve never ordered any kits from Andy, I’m told that they are very high quality and are exceptionally thought out.

After quickly considering a Tripan toolpost and changing my mind after I saw the prices on those I ordered a set of drawings for the MLA-23 toolpost.  The original design is for 9″-12″ swing lathes.  The Schaublin is an 8″ swing lathe.  After drawing up the original toolpost in Fusion and drawing up the Schaublin cross slide it was evident that it was too big.  I decided to design a scaled down version, making some changes along the way.

The largest change is in the dovetail size and the shape of the body itself.  I wanted something that would match the Schaublin’s size, but also look, so I manufactured the body out of round material instead of square.  The toolpost is optimized for 1/4″ HSS tools, but 5/16″ will fit.

The internal workings are that of the MLA-23 toolpost.  The design is exceptionally rigid and works very well.  It is also a wonderfully simple in design.  Part of the reason I really like this design is for its simplicity.  I believe the best design is one that doesn’t allow you to take anything away.  This design, in my opinion, is one of those designs.

Some people don’t like that the toolpost doesn’t repeat in angle position – that is once you loosen the locking handle you completely loose the rotational position of the toolpost.  This is a downfall of the design if you truly need rotational position repeatability.  When I work in the shop I’m constantly moving the toolpost around to allow for tool clearance.  So much so that I made a handle for my Aloris clone on my 10×18 lathe a number of months ago.  I do have provisions in the design to allow for graduations on the base to allow for visual rotational positioning.  We’ll see if I add it.

The build was interesting and fun.  I learned a number of things along the way including how to cut dovetails on the shaper.  It took a bit of time, but it reaffirmed the very useful nature of having a shaper in the shop.  Instead of waiting for a dovetail cutter I could grind up a simple tool and cut nice dovetails, at any angle, and get a super finish.  I’m told you can build the entire toolpost with a lathe, but there is a fair bit of milling work so even a mini mill would be a huge help.

Since the design borrows heavily from Andy’s design I don’t want to release drawings.  What I’m planning on doing is forwarding a set of drawings to Andy to include with his prints if he is interested.  So if you want to build the smaller version, which is a perfect size for the mini lathe, send me an email and I’ll try to get you a set of drawings.

I made a build video of the entire toolpost in montage style format as well.