Schaublin 102 is Making Chips!

Although I’ve talked about it with Max on the podcast, I’ve never announced on the blog that I picked up a made in Switzerland Schaublin 102.  102 is the turning radius in millimeters (about 4 inches).  The lathe was in pieces, but in very workable condition.  I dragged it home and it sat for a few months until I found the time to get to working on it.

This week I finally managed to get the 102 making chips.  It took some work mostly in the drive area.  I didn’t have access to the proper voltage to drive the existing motor so I decided to replace the original Schaublin motor with new 3/4 HP Baldor that I picked up a year ago for $50.  I also wanted to keep the mechanical variable speed drive working.  I could have got the old motor rewound, and I might do that some day, but the $800 that I was quoted was a bit rich.

After modelling up the existing motor in Fusion I designed up a pulley to fit the Baldor, spacers to place the new motor in the same location as the old one and a motor mounting plate.  I used old school methods to make up a plate to mount the VFD and associated electrical components.

I made a montage type video of all the work:

I was pretty happy with how it turned out.  Here is an animated gif showing a test cut that I did with the lathe:

Aside from making up the required parts, I spent a fair bit of time cleaning out the bed, cross slide, tailstock and the interesting air – oil lubricating unit for the spindle bearings.  I also have several hours fishing the air – oil lubrication lines back into place in the headstock.

I’ve never used a plain turning lathe before, and quite frankly until I did I thought they were a bit of a joke.  In the past no carriage or leadscrew caused me to immediately write off plain turning lathes as useless machines.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  In fact, as I used my import lathe more (which has a carriage and leadscrew) I realized that I do 80% of my work without such features.  If you have the chance to pickup a plain turning lathe in good condition, jump at it!   Many people devalue such machines and as such you can sometimes get a very good deal on a lathe that is exceptionally capable – and a joy to use.

Next up is a proper toolpost for the lathe, a backing plate for a Buck 6 jaw chuck I picked up, and probably a faceplate.  That is unless I manage to pick this stuff up used somewhere.  I really don’t count on that happening though.  Parts and associated tooling for Schaublins usually demand high prices.

 

 

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 7 – Work Holding

In a first for us we manage to get an episode recorded, edited, and posted in about 2 weeks!  Don’t worry we didn’t skimp on the quantity of the recording – this episode is a long as the rest of them (note nothing was said about quality!). In this episode we talk about work holding and tool holding in general.  Apologies for our voices – we both were recovering from colds.  Highlights include:

    • Max gets his turret finished just in time for Emma’s tool making competition: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xe3ACUzET7Y Check out the pile of chips on the watchmaker’s lathe:
    • Justin is inching (what is the metric equivalent?) towards getting the Schaublin 102 up and running.
    • Someone opens a beverage.  Identify the time and send Justin an email: justin@thecogwheel.net  to claim your prize!
    • Justin is recording in the middle of a terrible thunderstorm.
    • 2 Jaw independent chuck?  We talk about one:
    • Justin and Max are big fans of ER collets.  Maritool is a great source for production quality stuff at reasonable prices.
    • Stefan Gotteswinter gets his mention.
    • Use your 3D printer, or a 3D printing service to make soft jaws for your vise!  Or a fixture setup for your face plate.
    • Clamping nuts – we don’t know what they are called but Max made up a set of them.  Identify them, send Justin and email justin@thecogwheel.net and claim your prize!
    • Max thinks Justin should build some die holders with driving squares in them like these ones:

All that and much much more.

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 6 – All Scraped Up

Despite our terrible bantering in episode 2, Stefan Gotteswinter decides to come back on.  Max and I think perhaps he might be suffering from poor judgement.  In the longest episode to date we talk about:

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Many many thanks to Stefan for coming back on.  You can find his website here: http://gtwr.de/  Stefan also has one of the best machining Youtube channels: https://www.youtube.com/user/syyl.On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stefan_gtwr/

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw Max’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyofprecision/

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel  Justin’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecogwheel/

Pentel P209 Teardown

wrTie has begun!

To start off my titanium mechanical pencil build, called wrTie, I decided to teardown a number of different mechanical pencils for inspiration and design ideas.  I find the mechanisms in mechanical pencils very interesting.  I also find the manufacturing processes that are used exceptionally interesting.

Here is a teardown video of my favourite mass produced mechanical pencil: the Pentel P209 (0.9 mm version).  The Pentel P20x series (there are 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9 mm models)  has been around for a long time.  It is exceptionally well made given the price point it is hitting and the parts involved.  There are 12 parts in total, including 5 fully machined parts.  A number of the parts require plating.  There are 2 parts that are molded out of plastic.  And then it has to be assembled!  You can buy a Pentel P209 for less than $5 in the United States and less than $7 in Canada.  That’s actually pretty crazy considering this pencil contains machined parts and even more so once you consider that Pentel is probably selling it to it’s retailers for less than half of what they are retailed for.

https://youtu.be/tM4h61_BLKQ

The heart of the Pentel 200 series is a removable fully contained feeding cartridge.  The cartridge features a number of machined components in the feeding mechanism.  The components are probably massed produced on swiss style screw machines (a lathe but instead of the carriage moving the spindle moves in the Z direction – often called sliding headstock machines).   These machines could be cam actuated screw machines or they could be CNC controlled units.  CNC swiss style machines, like the ones produced by Star or Citizen, are really interesting machines.  Here is a video of a Citizen L20, one of the more popular CNC swiss machine that you will find today:

The Pentel P209 cartridge has been used in a number of titanium mechanical pencil builds on Kickstarter.  I can’t confirm it directly as I haven’t purchased one, but check out this project (you have to scroll about half way down and you’ll see a picture of what looks to be the Pentel cartridge: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cogent/titanium-mechanical-pencil-and-titanium-pen.  Given the Pentel’s design, you could easily make a new mechanical pencil by machining a new outside body for the Pentel.  I won’t be doing that because I think it is too easy!

 

 

 

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 5 – Cake Decorating and Hauling Iron

After getting confused as to what podcast they are recording, Max and Justin talk about hauling machine tools home.  Of course the stories keep getting better and more ostentatious the more they are told.  We also talk about:

You can listen to it directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel

Swarf in the Laundry

If you live with someone engaged in the home-shop machining hobby, and you are responsible for any domestic duties involving clothing, you have no doubt found swarf in the laundry. Just the other day, I shook out one of my husband’s sweaters he had worn in the shop, and a cute metal corkscrew resembling a tiny clock spring (no, my husband’s chips don’t always come off in perfect “9’s”) bounced on to the floor.  Our children thought it was cool.  We then examined a knit sweater that had been worn in the shop and noted several metal chips embedded in the weaves.  The next 15 minutes were spent scouring the house for magnets to see if we could pick-up the sweater.  It didn’t work, but the exercise ranked higher than our children’s 1 hour allotted TV time for the day.

I could start to nag at my husband for all the chips he is tracking in to the house via socks, sweaters and hair, but have thought better of it.  I have observed that the machining hobby has provided an interesting (and even productive) outlet for my husband’s creative energies and stress, while also providing many learning opportunities for our children, and even myself.

The video documentation of this hobby and its results via YouTube has also provided interesting learning opportunities for our family.  Its cute to watch the children excitedly bring other family members and friends to the computer screen to show them what Daddy is working on in the shop right now.  Our son has even started making his own videos with his V-Tech video camera of his Lego constructions.  This has been a great lesson to my husband and I to never underestimate the impact you’re having on those little eyes watching you.

Yes, it would be nice if I could park my car in the garage and Band-Aids weren’t a standard weekly grocery item.  But for all its benefits, I guess I’ll put up with the swarf in the laundry.
Megan is the wife of Justin.  She has the pleasure and the pain of dealing with a manufacturing gearhead on a daily basis.

Home Shop Machinists Podcast – Episode 4 – From Grass Cutting to Space

Max and Justin invite Dan Sherman on for some general shop talk.  We started talking about what is going on in the shop but in true home shop machinist fashion this episode heads off on several slightly off topic tangents.  Within this episode:

You can listen to the episode directly here:

or you can download it directly.

Special thanks to Dan for joining us.  Dan’s website: https://www.dans-hobbies.com/ Be sure to subscribe to Dan’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrnAb5KKg47gsiyfDxo-JJg

Subscribe in iTunes (and please rate us!): https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/home-shop-machinists-podcast/id1180854521

Max’s website: The Joy of Precision and also his Youtube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdMt_havo3BxZJscvRCOGcw

Justin’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/thecogwheel